Home Natural Remedies Stop your Anxiety and Depression with Magnesium and Vitamin D

Stop your Anxiety and Depression with Magnesium and Vitamin D

by Sean Martu

Most people are not aware that many of our psychological ills have genesis in mineral or vitamin deficiencies. Anxiety and Depression ais actually two of the top 5 most common Mental Ailments in the world. Luckily, both of these conditions can be alleviated by Magnesium and Vitamin D.

Magnesium

We are all magnesium deficient, especially if you live in America, all of the commercial farm soils are not only depleted of magnesium but also silica and all of the other major minerals that our bodies need. Magnesium is needed for over 300 co-enzymic functions in the body in many neural processes.

What are some of the common magnesium deficiency symptoms?

In addition to anxiety, of the many deficiency symptoms, some of the immediate effects of magnesium deficiency are:

  • Muscle spasms and tightness

  • Insomnia or sleep disturbances

  • Constipation

  • Headaches

  • Fatigue

Can I do a blood test for magnesium levels?

No, there isn’t a reliable blood test for magnesium deficiency. Magnesium is almost wholly stored in our bones or other organs like the brain, and less than 1% of magnesium stores are in the blood. Therefore, conventional blood tests do not accurately reflect the total magnesium body stores.

According to The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine’s article ” Magnesium Intake and Depression in Adults” –

Magnesium supplementation has been linked to improvements in symptoms of major depression,8 premenstrual symptoms,9 postpartum depression,8 and chronic fatigue syndrome.10 Low magnesium status has been associated with increased depressive symptoms in several different age groups and ethnic populations.

The PUBMED article “Rapid recovery from major depression using magnesium treatment” states –

Case histories are presented showing rapid recovery (less than 7 days) from major depression using 125-300 mg of magnesium (as glycinate and taurinate) with each meal and at bedtime. Magnesium was found usually effective for treatment of depression in general use. Related and accompanying mental illnesses in these case histories including traumatic brain injury, headache, suicidal ideation, anxiety, irritability, insomnia, postpartum depression, cocaine, alcohol and tobacco abuse, hypersensitivity to calcium, short-term memory loss and IQ loss were also benefited. Dietary deficiencies of magnesium, coupled with excess calcium and stress may cause many cases of other related symptoms including agitation, anxiety, irritability, confusion, asthenia, sleeplessness, headache, delirium, hallucinations and hyperexcitability, with each of these having been previously documented. The possibility that magnesium deficiency is the cause of most major depression and related mental health problems including IQ loss and addiction is enormously important to public health and is recommended for immediate further study.

randomized controlled trial in 2017 found that magnesium supplements improved mild depression and anxiety symptoms, contributing to the previous research finding a definite positive impact on mood. A 2017 systematic review concluded that about half the studies looking at magnesium and anxiety found a positive effect, but the studies were of poor quality. A slightly larger trial similarly found improvements in anxiety and stress symptoms, and a 2020 systematic review found benefits for mild depression symptoms and anxiety.

The best bioavailable forms of magnesium are Magnesium Threonate, Transdermal Magnesium Chloride, and Magnesium  Glycinate. Avoid Magnesium oxide as it has only 3% bioavailability to the body. Also, avoid magnesium glutamate and aspartate, as the two contain glutamic acid and aspartic acid which are components in the artificial sweetener aspartame, which is neurotoxic.

Personally, I’ve been using and recommending Drs Best Magnesium Glycinate for years.

Vitamin D3

Vitamin D is not actually a vitamin, but it’s actually converted into a hormone in our kidneys and cells by way of vitamin D receptors. Vitamin D actually modulates our genes, as well as managing many aspects of our physiology. A deficiency of vitamin D can cascade into a flurry of chronic and autoimmune conditions such as Cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, poor semen quality, depression, and osteoporosis. The higher our blood serum Vitamin D(25 hydroxy vitamin D) is, the more we become invulnerable to diseases such as rickets and cancer.

Everyone is vitamin D deficient because of our Western lifestyles of sitting in Buildings, cars, buses, and then our house or apartments all day. We are not getting outside. Worse, if you have darker skin, melanin acts as a sunblock to ultraviolet light, which is what our body uses to create vitamin D. So if you have darker skin, and if you live in the more temperate northern or southern latitudes, you are going to be more prone to varying diseases, such as diabetes and cancer.

According to the PUBMED article “Impact of Vitamin D Deficiency on Mental Health in University Students: A Cross-Sectional Study”

Students pursuing a university education are vulnerable to psychological burdens such as depression, anxiety, and stress. The frequency of vitamin D deficiency, on the other hand, is extensively recognized worldwide, and vitamin D regulates various neurological pathways in the brain that control psychological function. Therefore, the goal of this cross-sectional study was to determine the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and psychological burden among university students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia…The prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress among the vitamin D-deficient students was 60.35%, 6.31%, and 75.08%, respectively, which was significantly (p < 0.05) different from the control group. The odds of developing depression (OR = 4.96; CI 2.22-6.78; p < 0.001), anxiety (OR = 3.87; CI 2.55-6.59; p < 0.001), and stress (OR = 4.77; CI 3.21-9.33; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the vitamin D-deficient group. The research shows a strong association between psychological stress and vitamin D deficiency. To promote the mental health and psychological wellbeing of university students, it is critical to create awareness about the adequate consumption of vitamin D.

The article “Vitamin D Alleviates Anxiety and Depression in Elderly People with Prediabetes: A Randomized Controlled Study“, it states –

The exact mechanisms through which vitamin D can improve anxiety and depression symptoms remain poorly understood. ..Therefore, in this trial we showed that in a high-risk population, a weekly vitamin D supplementation scheme was effective in reducing anxiety and depression levels, while the benefits were similar in those with baseline concentrations in the zone of deficiency and insufficiency.

 

This article “Molecular Basis Underlying the Therapeutic Potential of Vitamin D for the Treatment of Depression and Anxiety” states –

In this review, we discussed the main evidence underlining the therapeutic potential of vitamin D in the management of depression and anxiety disorders. Of particular relevance, compelling evidence suggests that vitamin D possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, pro-neurogenic, and neuromodulatory properties, and, thus, may act in a similar manner to classic antidepressants.

The preeminent scholar on Vitamin D, Dr Holick recommends that we supplement with at least 2000 IU’s of vitamin D a day for health and to stave off ailments. This is a long, but incredibly informative presentation video on vitamin D by Dr Holick.

 

Necessary internet disclaimer:  All information and resources found on Nothingsincurable.com are based on the opinions of the author unless otherwise noted. I am not a doctor nor do I have any medical training, all information is intended to motivate readers to make their own nutrition and health decisions after consulting with their health care provider. The author of this site encourages you to consult a doctor before making any health changes, especially any changes related to a specific diagnosis or condition.

 

Necessary internet disclaimer:  All information and resources found on Nothingsincurable.com are based on the opinions of the author unless otherwise noted. I am not a doctor nor do I have any medical training, all information is intended to motivate readers to make their own nutrition and health decisions after consulting with their health care provider. The author of this site encourages you to consult a doctor before making any health changes, especially any changes related to a specific diagnosis or condition.

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